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Jenner By The Sea
10400 Coast Route 1
Jenner, CA, CA, 95450, USA
707.865.2377

Redwoods

  • redwood

Armstrong Redwoods State Reserve - Armstrong Redwoods State Reserve is a majestic hidden grove of ancient redwoods, left standing when the rest of the area's trees became the railroad ties for the Transcontinental Railroad in 1868. Armstrong Woods has wonderful trails for walkers, hikers, cyclists and horses. The reserve is 805 acres of old growth redwood trees and you'll find it easy to spend the day taking in the natural beauty there.

While visiting, be sure to seek out these interesting local sites and attractions:

The Tallest Tree The Parson Jones Tree is the tallest tree in the grove, measuring more than 310 feet in height. This is longer than the length of a football field! It's only a 0.1 mile walk from the park entrance.

The Oldest Tree The Colonel Armstrong Tree is the oldest tree in the grove, estimated to be over 1400 years old. It is named after a lumberman who chose to preserve this portion of the park in the 1870's. Colonel Armstrong Tree is only a half-mile walk from the park entrance.

The Icicle Tree This tree shows the unusual burl formations often found on redwood trees. Burls can weigh many tons and grow hundreds of feet above the forest floor. Why these growths occur remains a mystery.

The Discovery Trail This trail offers a wheelchair accessible pathway, interpretive panels in Braille, and tree hugging platforms.

Armstrong Nature Trail his self-guided nature trail is an easy stroll through the Grove and is also wheelchair accessible. Guides are available at the visitor center.

Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods (Stewards) is a non-profit organization that partners with the Russian River Sector of California State Parks. The sector includes Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve (outside Guerneville), Austin Creek State Recreation Area, Sonoma Coast State Park (from Bodega Bay to Jenner) and includes the Willow Creek watershed.

Armstrong Redwoods SR

State Reserve

Directions

Go east on River Road (Rt 116) until you reach Guerneville (15 miles). At the first stop light make a left hand turn onto Armstrong Woods Road. This road will end in the park after 2 miles.

The serene, majestic beauty of this Grove is a living reminder of the magnificent primeval redwood forest that covered much of this area before logging operations began during the 19th century. Armstrong Redwoods preserves stately and magnificent Sequoia sempervirens, commonly known as the coast redwood. These trees stand together as a testament to the wonders of the natural world. The Grove offers solace from the hustle and bustle of daily life, offering the onlooker great inspiration and a place for quiet reflection.

The ancient coast redwood is the tallest living thing on our planet! These remarkable trees live to be 500-1,000 years old, grow to a diameter of 12-16 feet, and stand from 200-250 feet tall. Some trees survive to over 2000 years and tower above 350 feet. Coast redwoods are classified as temperate rainforests and they need wet and mild climates to survive. The rainfall in Armstrong Redwoods averages 55 inches per year and the trees are often shrouded in a mystical fog that helps to maintain the moist conditions needed for the redwoods to survive.

The reserve includes a visitor center, large outdoor amphitheater, self-guided nature trails, and a variety of picnic facilities. While you can drive into the park, the best way to experience the dramatic affect of the towering redwoods, is to park in the lot at the park entrance and walk in for free. All of the park features are a short easy stroll along level trails that are disability accessible.

FEATURES OF THE GROVE

The Tallest Tree
The Parson Jones Tree is the tallest tree in the grove, measuring more than 310 feet in height. This is longer than the length of a football field. A .1 mile walk from the park entrance.
The Oldest Tree
The Colonel Armstrong Tree is the oldest tree in the grove, estimated to be over 1400 years old. It is named after a lumberman who chose to preserve this portion of the park in the 1870's. A half-mile walk from the park entrance
The Icicle Tree
This tree shows the unusual burl formations often found on redwood trees. Burls can weigh many tons and grow hundreds of feet above the forest floor. Why these growths occur remains a mystery.
The Discovery Trail
This trail offers a wheelchair accessible pathway, interpretive panels in Braille, and tree hugging platforms.
Armstrong Nature Trail
This self-guided nature trail is an easy stroll through the Grove and is also wheelchair accessible. Guides are available at the visitor center.